Vaccines Prevent Severe Disease From Omicron, New Studies Say – The New York Times

Pfizer said the treatment minimized the threat of hospitalization and death by 89 percent if offered within three days of the start of symptoms.After a cell is infected with the coronavirus, T cells can find out to acknowledge pieces of viral proteins that end up on the cells external surface area. The T cells then kill the contaminated cell, or notify the immune system to introduce a more powerful attack versus the virus.Dr. Alessandro Sette, an immunologist at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology, and Andrew Redd of the National Institutes of Health reported that despite Omicrons numerous anomalies, many of the protein fragments acknowledged by T cells are similar to those of other variants.Those findings suggest that T cells trained by vaccines or previous infections will react strongly to Omicron, rather than standing by. Burgers and her associates checked that possibility by collecting T cells from 16 people immunized with two doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine and exposing those T cells to protein fragments from the Omicron variation. The researchers found that the action of the T cells to the variation was about 70 percent as powerful as their response to the initial type of the virus.A number of researchers at the conference cautioned that these information come from studying cells in a lab, known as in vitro experiments.

Pfizer said the treatment decreased the threat of hospitalization and death by 89 percent if offered within 3 days of the onset of symptoms.After a cell is infected with the coronavirus, T cells can discover to recognize pieces of viral proteins that end up on the cells outer surface area. Alessandro Sette, an immunologist at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology, and Andrew Redd of the National Institutes of Health reported that in spite of Omicrons lots of anomalies, many of the protein fragments recognized by T cells are similar to those of other variants.Those findings recommend that T cells trained by vaccines or previous infections will respond strongly to Omicron, rather than standing by. Hamburgers and her associates checked that possibility by collecting T cells from 16 individuals immunized with two dosages of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine and exposing those T cells to protein pieces from the Omicron version.