Flu took a break in 2020, but its officially back. Experts say its not too late for Americans to get vaccinated. – USA TODAY

“Several Southern states and markets are revealing the most prevalent influenza activity this season, consistent with trends seen over the last 2 influenza seasons,” stated Dr. Kevin Ban, primary medical officer at Walgreens. The rise in screening is due to double COVID-19 and flu testing, experts say.:9 expert suggestions to help your child overcome their worry of shots”There is a concern that increasing flu rates might result in resource constraints,” said Arvind Kothandaraman, handling director of specialized diagnostics at PerkinElmer, a diagnostics and life sciences business.”Whether its due to the fact that individuals are feeling secured with their COVID vaccine, experiencing vaccine fatigue, or do not realize they can and ought to also get their influenza shot, the low vaccination rates are concerning,” said Ramzi Yacoub, chief pharmacy officer at SingleCare.”As of Nov. 20, about 39% of the U.S. populationhad gotten this seasons flu vaccine, according the CDC.The CDC advises everyone over the age of 6 months receive a yearly flu shot by the end of October,.

“Several Southern states and markets are revealing the most widespread influenza activity this season, constant with patterns seen over the last 2 flu seasons,” said Dr. Kevin Ban, primary medical officer at Walgreens.”Whether its since individuals are feeling protected with their COVID vaccine, experiencing vaccine tiredness, or do not understand they can and should likewise get their influenza shot, the low vaccination rates are worrying,” said Ramzi Yacoub, primary drug store officer at SingleCare.”As of Nov. 20, about 39% of the U.S. populationhad gotten this seasons influenza vaccine, according the CDC.The CDC suggests everyone over the age of 6 months get a yearly influenza shot by the end of October,.