Are We Wrong About Alzheimers? Researchers Question Prevailing Theory After New Discovery – SciTechDaily

Scientists at University of Cincinnati state restoring a brain protein, not eliminating amyloid plaques, must be the target of Alzheimers dementia treatments.
Experts estimate more than 6 million Americans are living with Alzheimers dementia. A current study, led by the University of Cincinnati, sheds new light on the illness and a highly discussed brand-new drug therapy.

The UC-led study, conducted in cooperation with the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, claims that the treatment of Alzheimers disease may depend on stabilizing the levels of a particular brain protein called amyloid-beta peptide. This protein is required in its initial, soluble kind to keep the brain healthy, but in some cases it solidifies into “brain stones” or clumps, called amyloid plaques.
The study, which appears in the journal EClinicalMedicine (released by the Lancet), begins the heels of the FDAs conditional approval of a brand-new medicine, aducanumab, that deals with the amyloid plaques.
Research study results graphic. Credit: Life Science Animation
” Its not the plaques that are causing impaired cognition,” says Alberto Espay, the new studys senior author and professor of neurology at UC. “Amyloid plaques are a repercussion, not a cause,” of Alzheimers disease, says Espay, who is likewise a member of the UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute.
Alzheimers illness ended up being commonly called “the long bye-bye” in the late 20th century due to the illnesss slow deterioration of brain function and memory. It was over 100 years earlier, nevertheless, that researcher Alois Alzheimer first identified plaques in the brain of clients suffering from the disease.
To evaluate their hypothesis, they evaluated the brain scans and spinal fluid from 600 individuals registered in the Alzheimers Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study, who all had amyloid plaques. They discovered that, regardless of the amount of plaques in the brain, the individuals with high levels of the peptide were cognitively normal.
Alberto Espay, MD, MSc, professor of neurology at the UC College of Medicine and Director and Endowed Chair of the James J. and Joan A. Gardner Family Center for Parkinsons Disease and Movement Disorders. Credit: Colleen Kelley/UC Brand + Creative
They likewise found that higher levels of soluble amyloid-beta peptide were related to a larger hippocampus, the location of the brain most important for memory.
According to the authors, as we age many people develop amyloid plagues, but couple of individuals develop dementia. In reality, by the age of 85, 60% of individuals will have these plagues, however only 10% establish dementia, they state.
” The key discovery from our analysis is that Alzheimers illness signs appear based on the depletion of the regular protein, which is in a soluble state, rather of when it aggregates into plaques,” states co-author Kariem Ezzat from the Karolinska Institute.
The most appropriate future restorative technique for the Alzheimers program will be renewing these brain soluble proteins to their regular levels, says Espay.
The research group is now working to evaluate their findings in animal models. Future treatments may be very different from those attempted over the last 2 years if effective. Treatment, states Espay, may consist of increasing the soluble variation of the protein in a way that keeps the brain healthy while avoiding the protein from hardening into plaques.
Reference: 28 June 2021, EClinicalMedicine.DOI: 10.1016/ j.eclinm.2021.100988.
Co-authors include: Andrea Sturchio, University of Cincinnati, and Samir EL Andaloussi, Karolinska Institute.
The research was moneyed by the UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute.
The authors disclose that they have just recently cofounded REGAIN Therapeutics, owner of a patent application that covers synthetic soluble non-aggregating peptide analogues as replacement treatment in proteinopathies.

Because then, Espay says that researchers have actually focused on treatments to get rid of the plaques. The UC group, he states, saw it in a different way: Cognitive disability could be due to a decline in soluble amyloid-beta peptide rather of the matching build-up of amyloid plaques. To check their hypothesis, they analyzed the brain scans and back fluid from 600 individuals enrolled in the Alzheimers Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study, who all had amyloid plaques. They found that, regardless of the amount of plaques in the brain, the people with high levels of the peptide were cognitively normal.
Treatment, states Espay, may consist of increasing the soluble version of the protein in a manner that keeps the brain healthy while preventing the protein from hardening into plaques.