Sorry, Cardio Doesnt Count as Leg Day

What if I run a lot?Heres where the problem comes in: if you want to invest more time on the trails and less time in the health club, can you use a lifting program that calls for upper and lower body days, and avoid the lower body things totally? Running (or biking, or hiking) utilizes your legs. Heres the good news, though: taking time to train your legs will make you quicker, more powerful, and perhaps even less injury-prone on your runs or rides.

Picture: lzf (Shutterstock) Cardio is necessary for our health in lots of methods, and we should all go for a minimum of the minimum requirement of 75 to 150 minutes weekly. If you enjoy running, cycling, or hiking and you do it more often, all the better.But we all need strength training. Both are essential, so if youre mainly a lifter, you must get some cardio a couple times a week; and if youre everything about running, you ought to still strike the weights. What if I run a lot?Heres where the problem comes in: if you desire to spend more time on the routes and less time in the health club, can you use a lifting program that calls for upper and lower body days, and avoid the lower body things completely? After all, running (or biking, or hiking) utilizes your legs. Unfortunately, no. To make your legs stronger, you need to challenge them appropriately with heavy weights or other suitable strength-building exercises. Running is basically the opposite of that: you do thousands of steps, but each one is just a percentage of work. To make matters worse, the much better you get at running, the more effective you are, and so the less work each of those actions really is. How do cyclists get those huge legs?Well, often its due to the fact that they strength train in addition to all their miles on the bike. They also frequently do strength-specific exercises using their bikes as resistance, which probably might partially change leg day. You or I downing up a few hills on a ride isnt the same kind of training. G/O Media may get a commissionSo, yes, you need to do leg day if you desire to be a healthy, well-rounded professional athlete. Heres the bright side, though: taking some time to train your legs will make you quicker, stronger, and perhaps even less injury-prone on your runs or flights. So rather of an upper/lower split, consider utilizing a full-body strength training regular and doing it twice a week. Or take a look at the rest of our ideas on how to integrate running and strength training, which you can adjust to whatever type of cardio is your favorite..