Ancient cave painters deprived themselves of oxygen to get high, new study suggests – CNET

The researchers think artists from between 14,000 and 40,000 years ago lit their method through caverns interior depths with flickering torches understanding the fire would decrease oxygen levels in the already improperly ventilated spaces. Some art was discovered in areas that included climbing up steps, crossing narrow ledges and even shafts that descended several meters deep.The scientists studied decorated caverns first discovered in Western Europe in the 19th century to more translate the enduring secrets of cavern art and explore what inspired these really early artists. Its been a good year for cavern art, which has much to inform us about how our forefathers thought and lived. Earlier this year, researchers recognized an image of a warty pig from 45,500 years ago that they believe to be both the worlds oldest cave painting and earliest recognized surviving depiction of the animal world.

When the bodys mandatory blood-oxygen concentration falls below a specific level, hypoxia follows. The researchers think artists from between 14,000 and 40,000 years ago lit their method through caves interior depths with flickering torches knowing the fire would lower oxygen levels in the already badly ventilated areas. Some art was discovered in locations that involved climbing actions, crossing narrow ledges and even shafts that descended a number of meters deep.The scientists studied embellished caverns initially found in Western Europe in the 19th century to more analyze the enduring secrets of cavern art and explore what inspired these really early artists.

A replica painting from Spains Cave of Altamira, house to various paintings of contemporary local animals and human hands created in between 18,500 and 14,000 years earlier during the Upper Palaeolithic duration..
Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images.
Ancient cave painters sometimes developed intricate images in dark, narrow passages accessible just with synthetic light. “It was not the design that rendered the caves substantial,” the study states. “Rather, the significance of the picked caves was the factor for their design.”.

To research her hypothesis, Kedar and her fellow scientists simulated the impact of torches on oxygen concentrations in closed spaces such as those in the Upper Paleolithic caverns. Its been an excellent year for cavern art, which has much to tell us about how our forebears lived and thought. Earlier this year, scientists identified an image of a warty pig from 45,500 years ago that they believe to be both the worlds oldest cave painting and earliest known making it through representation of the animal world.

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