Cold Tooth Pains Mysterious Molecular Culprit – The New York Times

Theres nothing quite like the peculiar, bone-jarring response of a damaged tooth exposed to something cold: a bite of ice cream, or a cold beverage, and all of a sudden, that sharp, searing feeling, like a needle piercing a nerve.Researchers have known for years that this phenomenon results from damage to the tooths protective outer layer. The discovery offers a glance of the connection in between the outer world and the interior of a tooth, and might one day help assist the development of treatments for tooth pain.More than a decade ago, Dr. Katharina Zimmerman, now a teacher at Friedrich-Alexander University in Germany however then completing postdoctoral research in the lab of David Clapham at Harvard Medical School, found that cells producing a protein called TRPC5 were sensitive to cold. At the heart of the dentin is the tooths soft pulp, where nerve cells and cells called odontoblasts, which produce dentin, are intertwined.The dominating theory for how teeth pick up cold had actually been that temperature modifications put pressure on the fluid in dentins tunnels, somehow provoking an action in those hidden nerves.

Theres nothing quite like the peculiar, bone-jarring reaction of a damaged tooth exposed to something cold: a bite of ice cream, or a cold drink, and suddenly, that sharp, searing feeling, like a needle piercing a nerve.Researchers have understood for years that this phenomenon results from damage to the tooths protective outer layer. The discovery provides a look of the connection in between the external world and the interior of a tooth, and could one day aid direct the advancement of treatments for tooth pain.More than a years ago, Dr. Katharina Zimmerman, now a teacher at Friedrich-Alexander University in Germany however then finishing postdoctoral research study in the laboratory of David Clapham at Harvard Medical School, found that cells producing a protein called TRPC5 were delicate to cold. At the heart of the dentin is the tooths soft pulp, where nerve cells and cells called odontoblasts, which make dentin, are intertwined.The prevailing theory for how teeth pick up cold had been that temperature modifications put pressure on the fluid in dentins tunnels, in some way provoking a response in those hidden nerves.