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Severe COVID-19 riskier than heart attack for young adults; antibiotic shows no benefit – Yahoo News

https://news.yahoo.com/severe-covid-19-riskier-heart-190554603.html

By Nancy Lapid
( Reuters) – The following is a roundup of some of the current clinical studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to discover treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the health problem triggered by the infection.

Open https://tmsnrt.rs/3a5EyDh in an external internet browser for a Reuters graphic on vaccines and treatments in advancement.

More young adults survive cardiac arrest than severe COVID-19
Among COVID-19 patients treated at 419 U.S. medical facilities from April through June, just about 5% were ages 18 to 34. However that group had “significant rates of unfavorable outcomes,” according to a report on Wednesday in JAMA Internal Medicine. Approximately one in five required extensive care, one in 10 required mechanical ventilation, and nearly 3% died. While the mortality rate is lower than in older grownups, it is approximately double the death rate of young people from cardiovascular disease, the authors state. Obesity, high blood pressure, and diabetes were tied to greater risk for unfavorable occasions. For young grownups with more than among these conditions, the danger of a bad outcome was similar to middle-aged grownups without the danger elements. More than half of hospitalized young people were Black or Hispanic, “constant with prior findings of out of proportion illness severity in these demographic groups,” the authors stated. “Given the greatly rising rates of COVID-19 infection in young adults, these findings highlight the value of infection prevention procedures in this age group,” the concluded. (https://bit.ly/2DHodce, https://bit.ly/3bEsJF8).

Risk of capturing COVID-19 while hospitalized can be low.
Among nearly 8,500 clients confessed to a large Boston healthcare facility between early March and the end of May, just two ended up being sick with coronavirus infections that might have been gotten while they were hospitalized, physicians report. One most likely was infected by a partner who at first appeared well throughout daily check outs but who established signs while the client was still hospitalized. That was prior to visitor restrictions and universal masking rules had been carried out. The other client established signs four days after leaving the health center. The source of the infection is not known. According to a paper released on Wednesday in JAMA Network Open, infection control efforts at the healthcare facility included devoted COVID-19 units with air-borne infection seclusion spaces, personal protective equipment for personnel and keeping track of to make certain those were used correctly, universal masking, visitor constraint, and liberal COVID-19 testing of asymptomatic and symptomatic clients. These “robust and extensive infection control practices may be associated with minimized threat” of COVID-19 dispersing through hospitals, the authors conclude. Their findings, if replicated at other U.S. medical facilities, “ought to offer peace of mind to patients,” they said. (https://bit.ly/32bgWLm).

( Reporting by Nancy Lapid; Editing by Bill Berkrot).

Antibiotic stops working to help hospitalized COVID-19 patients.
The antibiotic azithromycin did not appear to provide any benefit to hospitalized COVID-19 patients who were having difficulty breathing, according to a research study in Brazil. At 57 health centers, 243 COVID-19 patients who required oxygen or mechanical ventilation were randomly appointed to receive azithromycin, while 183 similar patients did not get the antibiotic. All got other standard treatment, which in Brazil included hydroxychloroquine, a malaria drug that other studies have shown offers little or no advantage. While azithromycin did not appear to do any harm, after 15 days it was not associated with any patient improvement nor did it minimize their risk of death. In an April survey of more than 6,000 doctors in 30 countries, azithromycin was the second most frequently prescribed treatment for COVID-19, the study private investigators composed in The Lancet medical journal. The absence of any benefit in this brand-new study “suggests that the routine usage of this technique need to be prevented,” they said. (https://bit.ly/35l8QBN, https://bit.ly/2ZDBBWT).
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Longer-term COVID-19 lung damage can enhance in time.
COVID-19 lung damage persists long term but tends to enhance, scientists reported on Monday at the European Respiratory Society International Virtual Congress. Researchers studied 86 hospitalized COVID-19 clients, 48% of whom had a cigarette smoking history and 21% of whom needed intensive care. At 6 weeks after discharge, 47% of clients still reported sensation brief of breath. By 12 weeks, that dropped to 39%. CT scans still revealed lung damage in 88% of clients at 6 weeks, dropping to 56% at 12 weeks. “Overall, this study shows that COVID-19 survivors have persisting pulmonary impairment weeks after recovery. Yet, overtime, a moderate enhancement is noticeable,” lead scientist Dr. Sabina Sahanic, from University Clinic of Internal Medicine in Innsbruck, Austria, stated throughout a press briefing. A related research study included at the meeting worried the importance of early lung rehabilitation after COVID-19 clients come off a ventilator. This should consist of balance and walking, muscle fortifying, respiratory workouts and endurance training. “The earlier rehabilitation began and the longer it lasted, the much faster and better was the enhancement in clients walking and breathing capacities and muscle gain,” coauthor Yara Al Chikhanie, from Grenoble Alps University in France, stated in a declaration. (https://bit.ly/3bI8uq8).

Amongst COVID-19 clients treated at 419 U.S. health centers from April through June, just about 5% were ages 18 to 34. The antibiotic azithromycin did not appear to offer any advantage to hospitalized COVID-19 clients who were having difficulty breathing, according to a research study in Brazil. At 57 health centers, 243 COVID-19 patients who needed oxygen or mechanical ventilation were randomly appointed to receive azithromycin, while 183 comparable patients did not get the antibiotic. According to a paper published on Wednesday in JAMA Network Open, infection control efforts at the medical facility included devoted COVID-19 units with air-borne infection seclusion spaces, personal protective devices for staff and keeping track of to make sure those were used properly, universal masking, visitor constraint, and liberal COVID-19 testing of asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Researchers studied 86 hospitalized COVID-19 clients, 48% of whom had a cigarette smoking history and 21% of whom needed intensive care.