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Autopsy Report Shows Woman Who Died of COVID-19 on Spirit Airlines Flight Experienced Shortness of Breath – NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

Earlier this week, Dallas County announced it learned that over the summer a woman died of COVID-19 died while on a Spirit Airlines flight back to North Texas.

The Federal Aviation Administration said Spirit Airlines Flight 208, an Airbus A320, was leaving from Las Vegas on July, 24 and headed to Dallas-Fort Worth. The flight was diverted to Albuquerque, NM, due to the passenger’s medical issue.

“They ran to get oxygen and we saw people performing CPR on her,” said Talitha Burris. She and her husband were on the same flight headed back to DFW.

She recalled seeing the woman board the plane and was six rows back. Burris said the flight started off normal and she fell asleep. Less than an hour in the air, Burris woke up to the flight attendants asking on the loudspeaker if there was a doctor on board.

“Probably about maybe 20 minutes, later 30 minutes later, we heard somebody talking really loud and fall. The stewardess is going back and forth down the aisles. We’re trying to figure out what was going on and once they turned the lights on, we saw the lady, laid out on her back in the aisle,” said Burris.

People on the flight started to pray and Burris posted on social media asking for prayers after the woman’s sister reached out to the strangers on board.

“Her sister was kind of pacing back and forth, and her sister was like, ‘Hey, if you guys are praying people. I know you don’t know me or anything, this is my sister and we’re trying to get back home to her family. We don’t know what’s going on but if you guys would not mind praying with me,” explained Burris.

She recalled two passengers and flight attendants working hard to revive the woman.

“Looked like she (flight attendant) may have been in her 20s, she was so tired from trying to perform CPR, she started sweating, like she was drenched with sweat. And she almost passed out herself because she just would not give up, she really was trying to save this lady. And there were times when we could hear the sister say, ‘Come on, you can do it. Come on, you can do it.’ She’s clapping, and so when she clapped, we all started clapping because we’re thinking, ‘okay she’s conscious, you know,’ but she was unconscious,” explained Burris.

The flight landed in New Mexico where paramedics came onboard the flight.

“They take her out and so we’re like, ‘Okay, thank God, she got some help, they are rushing her to emergency,’ that’s what we all thought,” explained Burris. She said half an hour later the pilot told them they were waiting on the coroner.

“We realized she had died, she had passed away,” she said.

The Office of the Medical Investigator at the University of New Mexico said 38-year-old Wanda Griffin died of a COVID-19 infection and listed significant contributory conditions such as asthma and morbid obesity. It said Griffin “had been experiencing shortness of breath, which was not relieved by her inhaler medication, and was provided oxygen before she collapsed.”

Spirit Airlines stated the following.

“We offer sincere condolences to the family and friends of our Guest who passed away. Our Flight Attendants have in-depth training to respond to medical emergencies and utilize several resources, including communicating with our designated on-call medical professionals on the ground, using onboard medical kits and personal protective equipment, and receiving assistance from credentialed medical personnel traveling on the flight.”

Burris said after the news reports and from friends, she put two-and-two together and realized it was the same woman on her flight.

“I was really emotional, and I’m just getting emotional just thinking about it, but I remember when I posted I said, ‘Tell your family that you love them. You know, any type of issues, it doesn’t matter because we saw this lady get on a flight, just like we did and I said to myself, ‘I’m like that could have been us,” said Burris.

She was also concerned for the passengers and flight attendants whom she called heroes who tried to save Griffin’s life.

“They performed CPR no mask. There were no masks. They were in that lady’s face and trying to save her with, you know, disregard of their own health because they were, you know, we saw human life. And so the people who actually do CPR I would wonder you know if they were affected by it or infected by it,” said Burris.

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NC coronavirus update October 22: Durham Public Schools to talk restarting athletics for students – WTVD-TV

RALEIGH, N.C. (WTVD) — Here are the latest updates about
COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, in North Carolina.

What can we help you with? View our COVID-19 information and resources page here

7:55 a.m.

Health officials in North Carolina say a COVID-19 outbreak linked to a church has left at least two people dead. Mecklenburg County authorities said Wednesday that there are now 68 cases since the local health department initially reported the outbreak on Saturday.

That was one week after the multi-day event at the United House of Prayer for All People in Charlotte on Oct. 11. The county says four people have been hospitalized.

County officials also have notified other local health departments in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, New Jersey and New York to monitor for cases connected to the church events.

THURSDAY MORNING STORYLINES

Athletes in the Durham Public School district haven’t been able to hit the field in months, but that could change after tonight. DPS is one of the few districts in the area that’s not reopened athletic programs for practices and games. Wake County is utilizing a phased approach to restarting sports.

The North Carolina High School Athletic Association suspended athletics in March, but most of their member schools have since restarted athletics. DPS will hold a meeting tonight at 6:30 with athletics as a topic of discussion.

All elementary school students in Wilson County will return to the classroom on Thursday. Students will be allowed in the school building while wearing required face masks. Middle school students will return to school buildings under a Plan B schedule.

Free COVID-19 testing is available in Chatham County on Thursday. You can get a test at Northwood High School on Thursday and on Monday, free testing will be available at Chatham Central High School. The county has registration information available on its website.

WEDNESDAY
2:15 p.m.
Gov. Roy Cooper announced that he would pause the expiration of Phase 3 COVID-19 restrictions for at least another three weeks.

The restrictions were set to end Friday, but with key metrics such as cases, positivity rate and hospitalizations increasing, Cooper said it was important to hold the course.

Cooper was joined by NCDHHS Secretary Dr. Mandy Cohen to give a live update on the state’s COVID-19 response.

Though Cohen noted a slight decrease in the state’s surveillance of COVID-like syndromic visits to emergency rooms, she outlines that the trajectory of positive cases is higher than it was at the state’s last peak in July.

Cohen also noted that though the percentage of positive tests is lower than it was in July, it is trending higher from previous weeks, and she would like to see the metric drop back down to 5%.

The pair emphasized the importance of everybody adhering to the three Ws of wearing a mask, waiting at least six feet apart, and washing hands.

“We’re doing everything we can to slow the spread of this virus. The simple fact is we can’t do it on our own,” Cohen said. “Ignoring the virus does not make it go away, just the opposite.”

Cooper added that local law enforcement agencies will be enforcing the state mask mandate, alcohol curfew, and mass gathering limits.

“I do believe most of the people in North Carolina do want to slow the spread of this virus and they understand that collectively, we have the power to do that,” Cooper said.

1:45 p.m.
NCDHHS reported 1,842 new COVID-19 cases, marking more than 250,000 cases since the beginning of the pandemic. The state also reported just 16,150 more completed COVID-19 tests with a percent positive rate of 7.4%.

The state also reported 40 more deaths related to COVID-19, bringing the death toll above 4,000.

Currently 1,219 people are hopsitalized with COVID-19 statewide.

1:25 p.m.
In a new weekly report, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services outlined the number of COVID-19 cases and deaths associated with clusters in workplaces, businesses, schools, housing facilities and community events.

As COVID-19 metrics head in the wrong direction, NCDHHS officials have repeatedly said smaller gatherings are driving the current spike in infection. According ot the report, clusters from social gatherings–including family gatherings, parties, weddings and funerals–have increased over the past two weeks. In September, the number of cases associated with clusters in religious gatherings increased.

According to the report, 231 cases and two deaths have been attributed to 23 clusters related to social gatherings statewide, and 26 cases were related to one community event.

At least 1,040 cases and 13 deaths have been linked to 76 clusters at religious gatherings.

Clusters have also been reported at restaurants, retail locations, personal care salons, and several workplaces. Though 3,841 COVID-19 cases and 19 deaths were associated with meat and poultry processing plants, health officials said clusters in these facilities have been decreasing since May.

NCDHHS clarifieid in the report that a cluster is defined as five or more cases related to a particular event or location. The clusters included in the report were submitted by local health departments, and because many represent industries that do not have to announce clusters to NCDHHS, many were voluntarily reported. Therefore, health officials said the cluster list is an underrepresentation of the full scope of clusters and associated cases statewide.

Click here to see the full list.

1:07 p.m.
Sampson County reported one new death from COVID-19, bringing the county total to 29. There were 20 new cases reported, bringing the total number of cases to 2,621

11:25 a.m.

Health officials in Mecklenburg County said Tuesday evening they are investigating at least 50 confirmed cases of COVID-19 connected to an event at a church, according to local media.

Mecklenburg County urged all people who attended convocation events at the United House of Prayer for All People on Oct. 10 and 11 to get tested, The Charlotte Observer reported Monday. At the time, the county linked at least nine cases of COVID-19 to the weekend event.

Mecklenburg County Deputy Health Director Raynard Washington said the number has nearly tripled. Washington says the church made an effort to ensure masks were worn and that those attending practiced social distancing, but he said people didn’t always comply.

10:45 a.m.
North Carolina health officials sent a letter to local leaders asking for help in slowing the spread of COVID-19.

The letter was sent to leaders in 36 counties that met the following metrics: the county has had 300 or more new cases in the last 14 days and has been identified by the White House Task Force as a county of concern; the rate of cases is greater than 50 cases per 10,000 people; or the county is one of the three most populous in the state.

In addition to the 3 Ws, the letter outlined local actions that could be made for those violating COVID-19 executive orders including possibly adopting an ordinance that imposes a civil penalty, issuing a local emergency proclamation and supporting the local health director enforce an imminent hazard abatement order against those who fail to comply with the governor’s executive order

“The incredible work of our local partners has allowed North Carolina to avoid the first and second waves of rapid spikes in COVID-19 positives that devastated so many other states. To protect our communities, we must continue working together in this fight against COVID-19,” wrote NCDHHS Secretary Mandy K. Cohen, M.D., and NCDPS Secretary Erik A. Hooks.

The letter was sent to leaders in Alamance, Avery, Burke, Caldwell, Caswell, Catawba, Chowan, Cleveland, Craven, Cumberland, Davidson, Duplin, Edgecombe, Gaston, Graham, Greene, Guilford, Hoke, Hyde, Johnston, Lincoln, Mecklenburg, Moore, Nash, New Hanover, Onslow, Pitt, Randolph, Robeson, Rockingham, Rowan, Scotland, Union, Wake, Watauga and Wayne counties.

10:05 a.m.
Lee County health officials reported the 18th COVID-19 related death in the county.
10 a.m.
The state’s Medicaid program is extending temporary provider rate increases related to COVID-19 through the end of the federal COVID-19 public health emergency.

The emergency goes through Jan. 21, 2021.

This will extend all COVID-19 rate increases currently in place. Every Medicaid provider will continue to receive rates that are at least 5% greater than pre-COVID levels.

“Medicaid providers have continued to step up to meet beneficiary needs throughout the COVID-19 public health emergency,” said NCDHHS Secretary Mandy K. Cohen, M.D. “We greatly appreciate the efforts of our providers and are committed to supporting them as they care for our most vulnerable beneficiaries.”

Providers such as nursing homes dealing with extra costs due to COVID-19 will continue to get additional financial support.

WEDNESDAY MORNING STORYLINES

Gov. Roy Cooper is scheduled to speak today as COVID-19 trends continue to worsen in North Carolina.

Tuesday’s report was led by the percent positive test rate, which jumped to 7.4%. Hospitalizations also jumped above 1,200 for the first time since July 31. Phase 3 of the state’s reopening plan is set to expire Friday.

Fifty-three more deaths were reported Tuesday. New numbers will be released Wednesday around noon.

On Oct. 2, Gov. Cooper announced that bars — for the first time since March — could open with limited outdoor capacity. Movie theatres, amusement parks, and outdoor venues were also allowed to open with limited capacity. A statewide 11 p.m. alcohol curfew remained in place until at least Friday.

Earlier this month, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mandy Cohen said COVID-19 metrics remained stable throughout September, but also noted they were “fragile” and North Carolinians had more work to do in regards to fighting the virus.

Cooper and the state’s coronavirus task force will speak at 2 p.m. ABC11 will carry the update live on-air and here on abc11.com.

A COVID-19 testing site will open at Holy Name of Jesus Cathedral (715 Nazareth Street) in Raleigh on Friday, with testing going on through Sunday. Testing will available from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Other Wake County testing sites are available here.

Copyright © 2020 WTVD-TV. All Rights Reserved.

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Health

You Can Now Get a COVID-19 Vaccine in China. That Might Not Be a Good Thing – Yahoo News

CHINA-HEALTH-VIRUS
CHINA-HEALTH-VIRUS

A staff member works during a media tour of a new factory built to produce a COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine at Sinovac, one of 11 Chinese companies approved to carry out clinical trials of potential coronavirus vaccines, in Beijing on September 24, 2020. Credit – Wang Zhao–AFP/Getty Images

Li Shurui didn’t hesitate. Faced with putting his life on hold indefinitely or the risk of catching COVID-19 by returning to university in the U.K., the 22-year-old business student decided to roll up his sleeve and receive an experimental coronavirus vaccine.

Two injections of CoronaVac made by SinoVac (otherwise known as Beijing Kexing Bioproducts) cost 2,000 rmb ($300) at the private Taihe Hospital in the Chinese capital. The treatment still hasn’t passed final (Stage 3) clinical trials but is already being offered to the public on a first come, first served basis. Anyone can turn up, pay their money and get the jab. Li says hundreds were queuing to get immunized at the same time as him.

“I’m a little worried about side effects but more worried catching the virus overseas,” Li tells TIME. “But I haven’t had any problems from the jabs so far.”

It’s not just the CoronaVac vaccine on offer in China. An unofficial vaccine rollout is gathering pace despite the warnings of international public health experts. In September, state-owned SinoPharm revealed that hundreds of thousands of Chinese had already taken its experimental COVID-19 vaccines as part of a state initiative to protect frontline health workers and officials traveling to high-risk nations. In the eastern manufacturing hub of Yiwu this week, hundreds of people queued for a $60 dose of CoronaVac.

Read more: ‘We Will Share Our Vaccine with the World.’ Inside the Chinese Biotech Firm Leading the Fight Against COVID-19

“This is insane,” Adam Kamradt-Scott, associate professor specializing in global health security at the University of Sydney, says of China’s gung-ho vaccine rollout. “It is just unsound public health practice. We have previous examples of where vaccines that have not gone through sufficient clinical trials have demonstrated adverse reactions with long-term health consequences.”

As the coronavirus pandemic approaches its 11th month, with over 40 million cases and 1.1 million deaths globally, longing for a miracle cure becomes more desperate. But the consequences of a vaccine misstep could also be dire. In 1976, a rushed campaign to immunize millions of Americans against swine flu subsequently resulted in a small proportion developing chronic fatigue syndrome and helped spark the modern anti-vaxxer movement. Handing out a pre-approval vaccine without sufficient monitoring of efficacy and health of participants risks stoking public misinformation.

Read more: How an Election-Year Vaccine Rollout in 1976 Backfired

What’s more, since COVID-19 cases are so low in China, Stage 3 trials—when the vaccine is given thousands to see how many become infected, compared with volunteers who received a placebo—can only be conducted overseas. There have also not been any “challenge” trials where scientists deliberately expose vaccinated volunteers to the virus to test immunity. (Although controversial, such trials are about to go ahead in the U.K.)

But it’s not just China that’s getting ahead of itself. U.S. President Donald Trump has put enormous public pressure on regulators and pharmaceutical companies to make a vaccine available in time for the American election. On Oct. 16, Pfizer revealed it may begin rolling out its vaccine for emergency use in the U.S. by late November. Moderna has a similar timeline for emergency use, though cautions widespread vaccine distribution may not happen until the spring.

The difference in China, however, is that the virus has been largely contained domestically. The country reported only 14 cases on Wednesday, all imported. “It seems there is no need to get a vaccine in China,” says the student Li. “After all, the pandemic has little impact on life in China now; even masks are not mandatory here anymore.”

So why is China so aggressively rolling out vaccines? For the Beijing government, the fight against the pandemic has become a PR battle to drown out international criticism about its early mishandling, coverup and silencing of whistleblowers. Instead, China wants to rebrand itself as a source of vital PPE and, ultimately, a solution the crisis. China’s National Health Authority projected China’s COVID-19 vaccine production capacity will reach 610 million doses annually by the end of 2020. SinoPharm’s boss says his firm alone may be able to produce more than 1 billion doses next year.

Read more: Inside the Unprecedented Scramble to Immunize the World Against COVID-19

Sinovac has promised to supply 40 million CoronaVac doses to Indonesia by March 2021. São Paulo Governor João Doria said Brazil’s federal government had also agreed to buy 46 million doses of CoronaVac, one of at least five vaccines undergoing stage 3 trials in the country, which has the world’s third highest infection tally.

“The first results of the clinical study conducted in Brazil prove that among all the vaccines tested in the country, CoronaVac is the safest, the one with the best and most promising rates,” Doria told reporters Monday.

Of course, China is not alone in craving the PR benefits. On Aug. 11, Russian President Vladimir Putin unveiled what was ostensibly the world’s first COVID-19 vaccine, which he said had already been administered to his daughter. The trade name—Sputnik 5, after the groundbreaking Soviet satellite—leaves no doubt at the national pride wrapped in its development. But it was tested on only 76 people—38 in Phase I and 38 in Phase II trials—and hadn’t even entered phrase 3 trials. The vaccine hasn’t stopped COVID-19 from spiking to record levels in the country this month.

“My gut reaction is that this is China’s attempt to claim international prestige by being first to rollout a widespread vaccination program,” says Kamradt-Scott, the Australian global health expert. “Unfortunately, I just see politics at play here rather than public health.”

Correction, Oct. 22:

The original version of this story incorrectly stated that Beijing Kexing Bioproducts and SinoVac are separate companies. They are the same.

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Health

Spike in South Korea flu shot deaths fuels vaccine doubts – Al Jazeera English

South Korea is giving the seasonal flu vaccine to millions to ward off any complications with COVID-19.

At least 13 South Koreans have died after receiving flu shots in recent days, according to official and local media reports, fuelling doubts about vaccine safety even as authorities rule out a link and as global efforts to find a vaccine against COVID-19 intensify.

Health authorities said on Wednesday there were no plans to suspend the programme to vaccinate approximately 19 million people for free after a preliminary investigation into six deaths found no direct connection with the drug they had received.

“The number of deaths has increased, but our team sees low possibility that the deaths resulted from the shots,” Jeong Eun-kyeong, director of the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency (KDCA), told parliament.

South Korea ordered 20 percent more flu vaccines this year to avoid what it calls a “twindemic” of people with flu developing potential COVID-19 complications, and overburdening hospitals during the winter.

“I understand and regret that people are concerned about the vaccine,” Health Minister Park Neung-hoo said on Thursday, while confirming the free programme would continue.

“We’re looking into the causes but will again thoroughly examine the entire process in which various government agencies are involved, from production to distribution,” he added.

The deaths, including a 17-year-old boy and a man in his 70s, took place just a week after the resumption of the vaccination programme for teenagers and senior citizens on October 13.

No toxic substances had been found in the vaccines and at least five of the six people investigated had underlying conditions, officials said.

‘Uneasy’

The inoculation programme was suspended for three weeks after it was discovered that some five million doses, which need to be refrigerated, had been exposed to room temperature while being transported to a medical facility.

South Korea’s vaccines come from a variety of sources.

Manufacturers include local drug makers GC Pharma, SK Bioscience and Il-Yang Pharmaceutical Co, along with France’s Sanofi and Britain’s GlaxoSmithKline. Distributors include LG Chem and Boryung Biopharma, a unit of Boryung Pharm.

GC Pharma, LG Chem, SK Bioscience and Boryung declined to comment. Il-Yang Pharmaceutical, Sanofi and GSK could not immediately be reached for comment.

South Korea has extended its seasonal vaccine programme this year to avoid any potential complications as a result of COVID-19 complications.

The country has reported more than 25,500 cases of the coronavirus, keeping the disease in check through a robust contact-tracing and testing regime and physical-distancing measures, as the world rushes to develop an effective vaccine against the disease.

Officials said 8.3 million people have been inoculated with the free flu vaccine since it resumed on October 13, with about 350 cases of adverse reactions reported.

It is also offering a paid vaccine programme which, combined with the free programme, aims to ensure about 30 million of the country’s 52-million population are inoculated. Under the paid programme, the purchaser can select the vaccine provider from a larger pool of manufacturers.

Kim Myung-suk, 65, who is eligible for a free vaccine, was among a growing number of people opting to pay.

“Though just a few people died so far, the number is growing and that makes me uneasy,” she told Reuters news agency in Seoul. “So I’m getting a shot somewhere else and will pay for it.”

The highest number of deaths linked to the seasonal flu vaccination was six in 2005, according to the Yonhap news agency. Officials have said it is difficult to make comparisons to previous years because of the greater numbers of people taking the vaccine this year.

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The number of older people getting coronavirus in Europe is rising again. Thats really bad news – CNN

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{videoPinner.setIsPlaying(true);videoPinner.animateDown();}}},onContentReplayRequest: function (containerId, cvpId, contentId) {if (Modernizr && !Modernizr.phone && !Modernizr.mobile && !Modernizr.tablet) {if (typeof videoPinner !== ‘undefined’ && videoPinner !== null) {videoPinner.setIsPlaying(true);var $endSlate = jQuery(document.getElementById(containerId)).parent().find(‘.js-video__end-slate’).eq(0);if ($endSlate.length > 0) {$endSlate.removeClass(‘video__end-slate–active’).addClass(‘video__end-slate–inactive’);}}}},onContentBegin: function (containerId, cvpId, contentId) {if (mobilePinnedView) {mobilePinnedView.enable();}/* Dismissing the pinnedPlayer if another video players plays a video. */CNN.VideoPlayer.dismissMobilePinnedPlayer(containerId);CNN.VideoPlayer.mutePlayer(containerId);if (CNN.companion && typeof CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout === ‘function’) {CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout(‘removeEpicAds’);}CNN.VideoPlayer.hideSpinner(containerId);clearTimeout(moveToNextTimeout);CNN.VideoSourceUtils.clearSource(containerId);jQuery(document).triggerVideoContentStarted();},onContentComplete: function (containerId, cvpId, contentId) {if (CNN.companion && typeof CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout === ‘function’) {CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout(‘restoreFreewheel’);}navigateToNextVideo(contentId, containerId);},onContentEnd: function (containerId, cvpId, contentId) {if (Modernizr && !Modernizr.phone && !Modernizr.mobile && !Modernizr.tablet) {if (typeof videoPinner !== ‘undefined’ && videoPinner !== null) {videoPinner.setIsPlaying(false);}}},onCVPVisibilityChange: function (containerId, cvpId, visible) {CNN.VideoPlayer.handleAdOnCVPVisibilityChange(containerId, visible);}};if (typeof configObj.context !== ‘string’ || configObj.context.length 0) {configObj.adsection = window.ssid;}CNN.autoPlayVideoExist = (CNN.autoPlayVideoExist === true) ? true : false;CNN.VideoPlayer.getLibrary(configObj, callbackObj, isLivePlayer);});CNN.INJECTOR.scriptComplete(‘videodemanddust’);

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Coronavirus update: Washington state adds over 700 new COVID-19 cases, nears 100,000 total – KOMO News

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Utah heart attack victim competes for medical care amid surge in Covid-19 cases – CNN

‘);$vidEndSlate.removeClass(‘video__end-slate–inactive’).addClass(‘video__end-slate–active’);}};CNN.autoPlayVideoExist = (CNN.autoPlayVideoExist === true) ? true : false;var configObj = {thumb: ‘none’,video: ‘health/2020/10/21/utah-woman-almost-dies-no-hospital-beds-coronavirus-savidge-newday-vpx.cnn’,width: ‘100%’,height: ‘100%’,section: ‘domestic’,profile: ‘expansion’,network: ‘cnn’,markupId: ‘large-media_0’,adsection: ‘const-article-pagetop’,frameWidth: ‘100%’,frameHeight: ‘100%’,posterImageOverride: 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(currentVideoId && jQuery.isArray(currentVideoCollection) && currentVideoCollection.length > 0) {for (i = 0; i 0) {videoEndSlateImpl.showEndSlateForContainer();if (mobilePinnedView) {mobilePinnedView.disable();}}}}callbackObj = {onPlayerReady: function (containerId) {var playerInstance,containerClassId = ‘#’ + containerId;CNN.VideoPlayer.handleInitialExpandableVideoState(containerId);CNN.VideoPlayer.handleAdOnCVPVisibilityChange(containerId, CNN.pageVis.isDocumentVisible());if (CNN.Features.enableMobileWebFloatingPlayer &&Modernizr &&(Modernizr.phone || Modernizr.mobile || Modernizr.tablet) &&CNN.VideoPlayer.getLibraryName(containerId) === ‘fave’ &&jQuery(containerClassId).parents(‘.js-pg-rail-tall__head’).length > 0 &&CNN.contentModel.pageType === ‘article’) {playerInstance = FAVE.player.getInstance(containerId);mobilePinnedView = new CNN.MobilePinnedView({element: jQuery(containerClassId),enabled: false,transition: CNN.MobileWebFloatingPlayer.transition,onPin: function () {playerInstance.hideUI();},onUnpin: function () {playerInstance.showUI();},onPlayerClick: function () {if (mobilePinnedView) {playerInstance.enterFullscreen();playerInstance.showUI();}},onDismiss: function() {CNN.Videx.mobile.pinnedPlayer.disable();playerInstance.pause();}});/* Storing pinned view on CNN.Videx.mobile.pinnedPlayer So that all players can see the single pinned player */CNN.Videx = CNN.Videx || {};CNN.Videx.mobile = CNN.Videx.mobile || {};CNN.Videx.mobile.pinnedPlayer = mobilePinnedView;}if (Modernizr && !Modernizr.phone && !Modernizr.mobile && !Modernizr.tablet) {if (jQuery(containerClassId).parents(‘.js-pg-rail-tall__head’).length) {videoPinner = new CNN.VideoPinner(containerClassId);videoPinner.init();} else {CNN.VideoPlayer.hideThumbnail(containerId);}}},onContentEntryLoad: function(containerId, playerId, contentid, isQueue) {CNN.VideoPlayer.showSpinner(containerId);},onContentPause: function (containerId, playerId, videoId, paused) {if (mobilePinnedView) 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instance, isAdPause) {if (mobilePinnedView) {CNN.VideoPlayer.handleMobilePinnedPlayerStates(containerId, isAdPause);}},onTrackingFullscreen: function (containerId, PlayerId, dataObj) {CNN.VideoPlayer.handleFullscreenChange(containerId, dataObj);if (mobilePinnedView &&typeof dataObj === ‘object’ &&FAVE.Utils.os === ‘iOS’ && !dataObj.fullscreen) {jQuery(document).scrollTop(mobilePinnedView.getScrollPosition());playerInstance.hideUI();}},onContentPlay: function (containerId, cvpId, event) {var playerInstance,prevVideoId;if (CNN.companion && typeof CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout === ‘function’) {CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout(‘restoreEpicAds’);}clearTimeout(moveToNextTimeout);CNN.VideoPlayer.hideSpinner(containerId);if (Modernizr && !Modernizr.phone && !Modernizr.mobile && !Modernizr.tablet) {if (typeof videoPinner !== ‘undefined’ && videoPinner !== null) {videoPinner.setIsPlaying(true);videoPinner.animateDown();}}},onContentReplayRequest: function (containerId, cvpId, contentId) {if (Modernizr && !Modernizr.phone && !Modernizr.mobile && !Modernizr.tablet) {if (typeof videoPinner !== ‘undefined’ && videoPinner !== null) {videoPinner.setIsPlaying(true);var $endSlate = jQuery(document.getElementById(containerId)).parent().find(‘.js-video__end-slate’).eq(0);if ($endSlate.length > 0) {$endSlate.removeClass(‘video__end-slate–active’).addClass(‘video__end-slate–inactive’);}}}},onContentBegin: function (containerId, cvpId, contentId) {if (mobilePinnedView) {mobilePinnedView.enable();}/* Dismissing the pinnedPlayer if another video players plays a video. */CNN.VideoPlayer.dismissMobilePinnedPlayer(containerId);CNN.VideoPlayer.mutePlayer(containerId);if (CNN.companion && typeof CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout === ‘function’) {CNN.companion.updateCompanionLayout(‘removeEpicAds’);}CNN.VideoPlayer.hideSpinner(containerId);clearTimeout(moveToNextTimeout);CNN.VideoSourceUtils.clearSource(containerId);jQuery(document).triggerVideoContentStarted();},onContentComplete: 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Health

South Korea Tries to Quell Anxiety Over Flu Shots After 13 Unexplained Deaths – The New York Times

Then, previously this month, 615,000 dosages of an influenza vaccine shipped by another company were also remembered after a few of them were discovered to contain white particles, which the government referred to as being a harmless protein. Nearly 18,000 individuals had actually received dosages before they were remembered.
No serious harm had actually been reported from either of those lots, though dozens of people who received those dosages reported fevers or other minor complaints– which prevail responses to flu shots, authorities said. None of 9 people who died had actually gotten vaccines from those that had been remembered, they added.
Three days later, a 17-year-old boy in Incheon, just west of Seoul, died after receiving his shot. On the same day, an 82-year-old man who had also been inoculated passed away in the central city of Daejeon.
Four of the five individuals who died on Wednesday varied in age from 53 to 89. Information about the two other people who passed away, one on Tuesday and one on Wednesday, has not been released.

9 of those who passed away, all of whom had actually received flu shots in the past, got vaccines provided by several different local drugmakers, authorities said.
” Since the majority of people who got influenza shots with the same vaccines reported no significant problems, we concluded that those vaccines do not consist of toxic materials,” stated Kim Joong-gon, a professor of medicine at Seoul National University who led a group of detectives. “We concluded that we can exclude the vaccine as a problem.”.
In basic, flu vaccines have a great security record. In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that the body of scientific evidence over years “extremely” supports their safety.

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Determinants of Health – A practical approach!

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BMJ Sounds the Alarm: COVID-19 Vaccine Trials Cannot Tell Us if They Will Save Lives – SciTechDaily

But Doshi raises another important concern– that couple of or perhaps none of the current vaccine trials seem developed to find out whether there is a benefit in the elderly, despite their obvious vulnerability to covid-19.

For example, why kids, immunocompromised people, and pregnant women have actually mainly been omitted; whether the right main endpoint has actually been selected; whether safety is being effectively evaluated; and whether spaces in our understanding of how our body immune system reacts to covid-19 are being attended to.

” None of the trials presently underway are created to find a decrease in any major result such as hospitalizations, intensive care usage, or deaths. Nor are the vaccines being studied to figure out whether they can interrupt transmission of the infection,” he writes.

Vaccines are being hailed as the option to the covid-19 pandemic, however the vaccine trials currently underway are not created to tell us if they will save lives, reports Peter Doshi, Associate Editor at The BMJ today.

He describes that all ongoing stage 3 trials for which details have actually been launched are evaluating moderate, not severe, disease– and they will be able to report final outcomes when around 150 individuals develop symptoms.

Lots of might presume that successful stage 3 research studies will suggest we have a tested way of keeping people from getting extremely ill and passing away from covid-19. And a robust way to disrupt viral transmission.

Doshi states that we still have time to advocate for modifications to make sure the ongoing trials deal with the concerns that the majority of need answering.

Yet Doshi argues that vaccine makers have done little to dispel the idea that serious covid-19 was what was being evaluated.

Part of the factor may be numbers, says Doshi. Even trials involving 30,000 or more patients would turn up relatively few cases of severe disease because a lot of people with symptomatic covid-19 infections experience only mild signs.

Modernas trial is developed to discover out if the vaccine can avoid covid-19 illness, says Zaks. Like Pfizer and Johnson and Johnson, Moderna has actually designed its research study to find a relative threat decrease of a minimum of 30% in participants establishing lab-confirmed covid-19, constant with FDA and global assistance.

” Hospitalisations and deaths from covid-19 are simply too unusual in the population being studied for a reliable vaccine to show statistically considerable differences in a trial of 30,000 individuals,” he adds. “The very same is real concerning whether it can save lives or prevent transmission: the trials are not developed to discover.”

” The covid-19 vaccine trials might not have been designed with our input, however it is not too late to have our say and adjust their course. With stakes this high, we need all eyes on deck,” he argues.

In Pfizer and Modernas trials, for instance, individuals with only a cough and favorable lab test would bring those trials one occasion closer to their completion.

Reference: “Will covid-19 vaccines save lives? Existing trials are not created to inform us” by Peter Doshi, 22 October 2020, The BMJ.DOI: 10.1136/ bmj.m4037.

If the frail senior are not registered into vaccine trials in adequate numbers to identify whether there is a decrease in cases in this population, “there can be little basis for assuming any advantage versus hospitalization or mortality,” he alerts.

Moderna, for instance, called hospitalizations a “key secondary endpoint” in statements to the media. However Tal Zaks, Chief Medical Officer at Moderna, informed The BMJ that their trial does not have appropriate analytical power to assess that endpoint.

Zaks confirms that Modernas trial will not demonstrate prevention of hospitalization since the size and duration of the trial would need to be greatly increased to gather the necessary information. “Neither of these I believe are acceptable in the present public requirement for understanding expeditiously that a vaccine works,” he told The BMJ.

A number of covid-19 vaccine trials are now in their most advanced (stage 3) phase, but what will it indicate exactly when a vaccine is declared “efficient”?

The present stage 3 trials are not in fact set up to prove either, states Doshi.

Zaks also points to influenza vaccines, saying they safeguard versus severe disease much better than moderate illness. “To Moderna, its the exact same for covid-19: if their vaccine is revealed to reduce symptomatic covid-19, they will feel confident it likewise safeguards against severe results,” Doshi writes.

None of the existing trials are designed to detect a decrease in any major outcome such as hospitalizations, extensive care usage, or deaths.